Skip to content Skip to navigation

Mapping Borders and Connections: Mexico and the United States

Mapping Borders and Connections: Mexico and the United States

Published: July 27, 2017

(Español Aquí)

A five-session program  in the Fall will map the borders that separate us in Mexico and the United States, our connections across those borders, the destruction wrought by guns and the drug war, and our actions responding to these realities.  ‘Mapping Borders and Connections’ will work with participants from the US and Mexico in the Bay Area to map routes of migration, of arms, of drugs, and of action.

Receive more information or register now.

The sessions will draw out the geographies of participants’ and our families’ stories, and to provide participants with material to map the relationships and routes of connection and of US intervention between the two countries.

1. Tues. September 26, 1 pm: Routes of disappearance and search (370 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley campus), with special guests James Cavallaro, member of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission and Omar García, surviving Ayotzinapa student
2. Tues. October 10, 5:30 pm food, 6:00 program: Routes of Migrants  (Oakspot, 1721 Broadway #201, Oakland). Please RSVP to jlindsay-poland@afsc.org so we have sufficient food.
3. Sat. October 28, 11:00 am: Routes of Arms
(Unitarian Church, 685 14th St, Oakland; during AFSC centennial event)
4. Tues. November 14, 5:30 pm food, 6:00 program: Routes of Drugs  (Oakspot, 1721 Broadway #201, Oakland). Please RSVP to jlindsay-poland@afsc.org so we have sufficient food.
5. Tues. December 5, 5:30 pm food, 6:00 program: Routes of Action  (Oakspot, 1721 Broadway #201, Oakland). Please RSVP to jlindsay-poland@afsc.org so we have sufficient food.

We welcome you to participate in all five events or just one or two.

'Mapping Borders and Connections' is organized by Escuelita Comunitaria, a small but diverse group of activists and scholars. Its members include Abad Leyva, a film-maker and organizer from Guerrero, Mexico; Ivonne del Valle, professor of Spanish at UC Berkeley; Luis López Resendiz, coordinator fo the Binational Front of Indigenous Organizations and UC student; Linda Sánchez, director of 67 Sueños, which supports leadership of migrant youth; John Lindsay-Poland, researcher and writer on U.S. militarism in Mexico; and Estelle Tarica, Spanish professor at UC Berkeley.

Receive more information or register now.

All sessions are free of charge. Donations for food will be accepted.

close