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Posts from March 2019

Khary NY
By: Sophia Perlmutter
Published: March 25, 2019

Khary Bekka is a native New Yorker from Red Hook, Brooklyn. He works for AFSC’s Healing Justice Program in New York City, which works with people affected by the criminal justice system. In 1993, Khary was sentenced to 25 years to life. He returned home in January 2019. He is an activist, storyteller, Quaker, and an advocate for restorative justice.

Sophia: What does being a Quaker mean to you?

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By: Mike Merryman-Lotze
Published: March 25, 2019

Israel has begun bombing targets in Gaza and has issued call-up orders for thousands of reserve troops, signaling that a new large-scale attack on Gaza may be in its early phases. Political action is needed now in the U.S. to push for a halt to...

By: Lida Shepherd
Published: March 22, 2019

West Virginia is succeeding in eliminating barriers to food assistance and employment for formerly incarcerated people.

West Virginia, like many other states, has experienced a dramatic increase in the prison population over the last few decades. And once people finish serving their sentence, they continue to face punishment for their criminal conviction –confronting many barriers while transitioning to life outside of the prison walls. 

For tens of thousands of West Virginians and many more people across the United States, a criminal conviction  severely limits their...

By: Peniel Ibe
Published: March 22, 2019

The Trump administration has been making changes both small and drastic to U.S. immigration policies. While Trump’s cruel policies at the border and his ramping up of deportations and ICE raids have garnered the most attention and outrage, his other efforts to transform legal immigration have been no less radical. As administration officials and conservative commentators have said, deportations alone may...

By: Kathy Hersh
Published: March 21, 2019

Sign the petition to stop immigrant child detention today and help us get 100,000 signatures!

As I stood across the street from the Homestead detention center for immigrant children, I tried to imagine what it must be like for the Central American teenagers incarcerated in this “temporary” shelter on federal land near Miami. Very few visitors have been allowed inside, and fewer still have been able...

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