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End the Detention Quota

Join AFSC in working to stop the quota

Did you know that there's a federal policy that requires U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to maintain 34,000 spaces for immigrant detention every single day?

This "detention quota" fuels the mass detention of over 400,000 immigrants in the U.S. every year, while lining the pockets of for-profit prison corporations contracted to run detention centers. 

As long as Congress continues to mandate a detention quota, we will see more and more people funneled into this for-profit system of mass detention.  

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Tell Congress: End the detention quota

Take action today. Urge your elected officials to end to this inhumane federal policy.

Join us in calling on Congress to end the quota and support inclusive policies that respect the dignity and rights of all people. 

 

 

Stories of detention

A NJ family advocates for a father's release

For nearly a year, Victoria and her family have worked to free her husband, Moussa

No relief for a grandfather in Colorado

Supporters rallied just days before Martin Alvarez Martinez was deported.

Video: Watch Jorge's story

Jorge grew up in North Carolina but spent 15 months in immigrant detention. 

Mothers and children in detention

Families fleeing violence are among those locked up in U.S. detention centers.

Locking up asylum seekers

Emmanuel fled to the U.S. for safety and instead spent over two years in detention.

Action Toolkit

Tell Congress: End the detention quota

Urge your elected officials to end to this inhumane federal policy.

Guide to taking action from Aug. 22-26

Use this guide to take action on the quota every day this week.

3 things you should know about the quota

Share this page and handout to raise awareness about the quota. 

Social media toolkit

Spread the word by sharing these graphics with your friends online.

Quota preserve profits for prison companies

While corporations benefit from the quota, communities pay the price. 

Corporate influence

AFSC report: Why detention is big business for for-profit prison corporations.