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Videos

The Appalachian Center for Equality is dedicated to creating opportunities for young people to pursue their goals and a productive future by working and learning together. We accomplish this through interpersonal skill-building, college trips, and community engagement projects with the belief that together we can make our communities in southern West Virginia stronger and more vibrant for everyone. Video by AFSC intern Adrienne Miranda
In the summer of 1967, Carolyn McCoy was 12 years old and visiting Japan with her family. On Aug. 6, they visited Hiroshima, where they took part in memorial activities marking the 22nd anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city.  This digital story—created last month in an AFSC-led workshop at the Friends General Conference gathering—tells how the experience changed her life. The workshop
The American Friends Service Committee's Joseph Gerson discusses China's Rise at the March 13, 2012 Challenging the Pivot event in Cambridge, MA.
American Friends Service Committee's Jason Tower at March 13, 2012 Challenging the Pivot event, Cambridge, MA.
The West Virginia Economic Justice Project works statewide on issues affecting low income and working families and engages in campaigns to gain or defend economic rights in support of economic justice for all people.
Direction and Camera by Hasibullah AsmatiEditing by Hamed AlizadaSound and Additional Camera by Zarah Sadat
This video of immigrants and advocates from around the country was created by Yanex, an intern with AFSC. It includes seven principles for immigration reform.
If I Had A Trillion Dollars is a national youth video contest and film festival. We ask young people aged 10-23, "If YOU had the power to choose, how would you spend 1 trillion dollars? What could that money do for your family, for your community, for your nation, or for the world?" Youth then create a video for the festival, and many have the opportunity to travel to Washington, D.C. to share their ideas and visions with legislators on Capitol Hill in the spring. 
The first plastic army men were made during WWII. Making them out of this material helped conserve tin and other metals needed in the production of arms. During this time, they were still hand painted individually in the United States. Now they stand plain, unpainted, with modern weapons and fatigues, and are made in third world countries. They are very inexpensive and are sold mostly in supermarkets and dollar stores. I personally remember being a poor kid on welfare, and getting them regularly as gifts because they were one of the only toys my mother could afford.

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