Move the Money

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Move the money from battlefields to classrooms

By Arnie Alpert

In New Hampshire’s largest city, school started this fall with 150 fewer teachers and classrooms so crowded some classes had four students sitting at the teacher’s desk. Linda, a student at the city’s biggest high school, told her after-school youth group, “In my math class there are 41 kids. It’s very loud because everyone is having side conversations.” It’s pretty hard to get an education in an environment like that.

And it’s pretty hard to teach, too.

KC Move the Money Campaign

The federal budget crisis is not a deficit crisis, but a crisis of priorities.

Choosing to continue enormous tax breaks for the millionaires and spending 60 percent of public discretionary dollars on the Pentagon makes no sense, as millions struggle to find work and to feed and house their families.

Super Committee Failure Is Not A Crisis

Dear Friend,

It's time to give thanks. Yesterday, the congressional Super Committee actually gave us another reason to be thankful when it announced that the members were unable to agree on a plan to make $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next 10 years.

This is a testament to the grassroots voices – including yours – from around the country that made it clear that any deal should reflect the priorities and values of “the 99%.”  In this case, no deal was definitely better than a bad deal.

Reordering Priorities: Connecting Issues

Saturday, October 29, 2011 - 9:30am - 3:30pm

A Planning Conference for Long Term Change

A networking, planning day that focuses on the Move the Money campaign, engaging local elected officials in the effort to reorder priorities from military spending to meeting human needs.

Keynote speaker: Rukiya Dillahunt

Move the Money Resolutions

In communities across the country, groups are trying to get city councils, county councils, and other local municipalities to make a statement to their elected officials calling for cuts to the military budget and support for programs important in our communities. This material will give you tips on how to join this effort in your area.

Alert the Media

Tools you can use with local media to help tell your story about federal budget priorities.

How to Talk to Congress

Use this material to get your views on budget priorities across to your elected officials, either through visits or calls.

Move the Money Fact Sheets

Download our fact sheets that provide information about cutting military spending, raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans, job creation, and protecting those in the greatest need.

Complete Move the Money Toolkit

Download the full toolkit for a comprehensive set of tools to help your community work for better federal budget priorities. The toolkit includes fact sheets, suggestions about how to work with the media, how to talk with members of Congress and ask them questions, and how to get a resolution passed in your community to encourage Congress to support programs that fund our needs at home instead of the military. You can also download just parts of the toolkit.

Move the Money action toolkit

Bring the war dollars home

A rally to bring home dollars spent on war

Protestors demand reductions in Pentagon spending.

Use this toolkit to talk to your community, the news media, and directly to Congress about keeping resources in your community.

Who we are

AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

Where we work

AFSC has offices around the world. To see a complete list see the Where We Work page.

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