Hiroshima-Nagaski

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Never again! In commemoration of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Tuesday, August 6, 2013 - 7:30pm

Grace Amemiya at Hiroshima commemoration 8-6-12

Grace Amemiya at Hiroshima commemoration 8-6-12

Grace Amemiya, who spent time in a Japanese Internment camp during World War II, speaks in Des Moines about her experiences at the 2012 commemoration of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki bombings. For more photos from the rally, click here.

Parking is in the parking lot of the Iowa Judicial Building on the south side of Court Ave. The bell is west of that building. Please bring lawn chairs and flowers for laying at the bell. Rain site is Wesley UMC, 800 E. 12th.

Iowans commemorate Hiroshima-Nagasaki

[Adopted from a press release by Sherry Hutchison of WILPF and Des Moines Valley Friends Meeting.]

“From Hiroshima to Fukushima: the Nuclear Question” was the theme of the annual Hiroshima/Nagasaki observance at the Japanese Bell on the Iowa capitol grounds. Sixty Iowans attended the commemoration of the 67th anniversary of the bombings.

From Hiroshima to Fukushima: The Nuclear Fallout

Monday, August 6, 2012 - 7:30pm

Hiroshima-Nagasaki song leaders in Des Moines 8-9-10

Hiroshima-Nagasaki song leaders in Des Moines 8-9-10

Eloise Cranke and Ann Naffier, both former AFSC staff, join Highway Sigadi, formerly of the Simon Estes Youth Choir from Cape Town, South Africa, in leading songs at the 2010 Hiroshima-Nagasaki commemoration in Des Moines.

This event will include dignitaries, music, and a time to gather to lament the horrific nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki --

Details to follow the list of speakers and musicians ......  

The organizers of this event share the idea that nuclear weapons must be abolished from the face of the earth in order that the human species might live.

Talk by Hisroshima Survivor Junko Kayashigne

Wednesday, October 12, 2011 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

Junko speaks widely about her experiences and opposition to nuclear weapons across Japan and has traveled to a number of countries for this purpose, including to Egypt (to help teach rising members of its foreign service) and Korea, as well as here in the U.S. She was a keynote speaker at the national peace studies association conference a few years ago.  Her art provides her another way to powerfully communicate the grave dangers and immediate personal impacts of nuclear weapons. She will show a slide show or some of her art as part of her presentation.

Remembering Hiroshima: Imagining Peace art exhibit

Thursday, September 1, 2011 - 6:15am

September 21: exhibit
“Remembering Hiroshima, Imagining Peace 2011” (including art, political cartoon
and Japanese comic books) opens at CMU, 4th floor of Hunt Library. Dessert
reception at 4:30 pm at Maggie Murph Café, first floor. Through November 18.


Des Moines Mayor Frank Cownie calls for peace at Hiroshima-Nagasaki Commemoration

Large crowd convenes at Japanese Bell, recalls Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 22 organizations sponsor event

DES MOINES -- (Catholic Peace Ministry) A crowd of 100 assembled at the Japanese Bell on the Iowa State Capitol grounds Tuesday evening, August 9, 2011 to observe the 66th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The theme this year was "From Hiroshima to Fukashima: The Nuclear Fallout."

Nuclear Fallout: Weapons and Power Plants

Tuesday, August 9, 2011 - 7:30pm

Hiroshima-Nagasaki song leaders in Des Moines 8-9-10

Hiroshima-Nagasaki song leaders in Des Moines 8-9-10

Eloise Cranke and Ann Naffier, both former AFSC staff, join Highway Sigadi, formerly of the Simon Estes Youth Choir from Cape Town, South Africa, in leading songs at the 2010 Hiroshima-Nagasaki commemoration in Des Moines.

Join us for Des Moines' annual Hiroshima-Nagasaki commemoration. 

Speakers to include Des Moines Mayor Frank Cownie, a member of Mayors for Peace, and the mayor who signed a proclamation making our city a nuclear weapons-free zone. Physicians for Social Responsibility reports on the campaign in Kansas City to shut down the construction of a new nuclear-weapons plant; and updates on the Iowa campaign to halt nuclear plants in Iowa, restore the Japanese Bell, and to ratify the CTBT in the US Congress.

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