Healing Justice

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FILM - "The Empty Chair"

Monday, February 13, 2012 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

TThe documentary, "The Empty Chair," examines loss, punishment, and healing through four families' stories of a loss few of us could possibly comprehened: the murder of a family member and living through the aftermath.  Renny Cushing, a resident of Hampton and Executive Director of Murder Victims Families for Human Rights, is featured in this film.  Discussion follows film.  The Culture of Peace and Nonviolence film series is co-sponsored by Pace e Bene Nonviolence Service, AFSC, Concord UU Church, Temple Beth Jacob, NH Peace Action, NH UCC Peace with Justice Advocates. 

"Empty Chair" poster

Poster for Feb. 13, 2012 showing of "The Empty Chair" in Concord.

Preparing the way for truth and reconciliation in Maine

Denise Altvater and siblings

Denise Altvater and siblings

Denise Altvater (far right)and siblings weeks before they were taken from the reservation and placed in a non-native foster home by the state of Maine.

For decades, children across the country were routinely wrenched from their families and stripped of their identities in state-sanctioned efforts to assimilate Native children by placing them in foster care. Now, Denise has helped open the way for a truth and reconciliation process in Maine.

Conversation with Denise Altvater on Truth and Reconciliation in Maine

The following are excerpts from a recent conversation with Denise Altvater, AFSC’s Wabanaki Program Coordinator in Maine.  Keith Harvey, AFSC’s regional director in New England, hosted the telephone conversation, and several friends and supporters joined the call.

 Keith: Denise, would you introduce yourself and your work?

Friend of a Friend: What do we mean by love?

Participants in the "Friend of a Friend" program at the Maryland Correctional Center reflect on the meaning of love.

AFSC 2011 Highlights

This report provides examples of the work your generous support has made possible this year. As you read it, we are confident that the progress shown will fuel your optimism and determination. Thank you for being part of our community!

 

The Haves, the Have-Nots, and the Beloved Community

Keith Harvey, AFSC Regional Director in New England, is hosting a series of community phone conversations on the theme The Haves, the Have-Nots, and the Beloved Community

We'll be talking about economic justice,the peace we work for in the world, and the peace we work for within.   Please join us!

Community Phone Call: Truth and Reconciliation

Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 6:30pm - 7:15pm

Please join Denise Altvater, Coordinator of AFSC's Wabanaki Program, for the inside story of the historic Truth and Reconciliation Process now underway in Maine.  Learn about this extraordinary journey toward healing and forgiveness, and bring your questions for Denise!

Our host will be Keith Harvey, AFSC Regional Director in New England, who has launched a three part series of community conversations on the theme,  The Haves, the Have-Nots and the Beloved Community.

CURRENTS Closing Show

Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 7:00pm - 10:00pm

From the "Can You hear Me Now" Collection of F. Geofrrey Johnson

visual arts, CURRENTS, black men

From the "Can You hear Me Now" Collection of F. Geofrrey Johnson

CURRENTS: Black men's cultural activism - A Visual Arts Exhibit, with poetry, music and film is a visual art exhibit featuring works by F. Geoffrey Johnson and Kerly Suffren.  

Join us for the Closing Show featuring the rock/hip-hop sounds of Adams Morgan, vocalist Reci Reign, hip-hop sounds of Young Nova, and poets Theresa Davis and F. Geoffrey Johnson.

 

 

 

In the Land of the Free

Friday, December 2, 2011 - 7:00pm - 10:00pm

Angola State Prison

healing Justice, Friend of a Friend, black men, art activism

Prisoners perform hard labor at the Angola State Prison in Lousiana

CURRENTS is a visual art exhibit featuring works by F. Geoffrey Johnson and Kerly Suffren.  

Screening of the film “Land of the Free” about the Angola 3’s three generations in solitary confinement, followed by a discussion moderated by Dianne Mathiowetz and featuring Akinyele Umoja, African american Studies department head at Georgia State University and  Dominique Stevens from the AFSC Baltimore Healing Justice program focusing on the case of Marshall Eddie Conway and the over incarceration of African-American males.

Who we are

AFSC is a Quaker organization devoted to service, development, and peace programs throughout the world. Our work is based on the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. Learn more

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