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Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice

New York/New Jersey Healing Justice and Prison Watch

The Healing Justice and Prison Watch programs empower individuals harmed by criminal justice policies and violence to heal and transform the conditions under which they live. We recognize and advance the worth and dignity of all people in and around the criminal justice system. Program staff disseminate public information on human rights abuses and healing opportunities; respond to needs of incarcerated people and those harmed by criminal acts; influence individual administrators and policy makers; and provide expertise to coalitions, advocacy groups, community organizations, students, writers, and the media. 

Our Prison Watch Program monitors human rights abuses in U.S. federal and state prisons. In particular, the program promotes national and international attention to the practices of isolation and torture.

Our Campaign to End the New Jim Crow advocates for a paradigm shift in the use of incarceration and the continued punishment imposed by the collateral consequences of conviction and imprisonment. The campaign provides support to communities of color who are disproportionately impacted by incarceration.

Our Hope Lives for Lifers Project works with young men, ages 16-24, who are serving long sentences, including those sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. We help them in their quest for freedom and in their efforts to leave prison in the best condition possible.


 

Newark, NJ

The Newark office is home to the Immigrant Rights Program, the New Jersey base of the Healing Justice Program, and the online home for the New York Metro Internship Project.

The Immigrant Rights Program integrates legal services, advocacy, and organizing, providing legal representation in challenging immigration cases and also ensuring that immigrant voices in New Jersey and beyond are heard in policy debates. The program responds to myths about immigrants through presentations and media work.

The New York and New Jersey Healing Justice and Prison Watch Programs empower individuals harmed by criminal justice policies and violence to heal and transform the conditions under which they live. We recognize and advance the worth and dignity of all people in and around the criminal justice system.

The New York Metro Internship Project engages college and graduate students with hands-on, summer work experiences with AFSC.

Bay Area Healing Justice

The Healing Justice Program in San Francisco works to reduce reliance on incarceration and other punitive approaches and replace them with restorative/healing practices. Toward that end we concentrate on four areas: mass incarceration, long term isolation, the death penalty, and the promotion of healing alternatives.

In coalition with Californians United for a Responsible Budget (CURB), AFSC helps influence and monitor implementation of the U.S. Supreme Court decision requiring California to reduce its prison population; proposes sentencing policy changes that will reduce the number of people in prison; and promotes evidence-based programming that reduces recidivism.

The Healing Justice Program works to abolish the death penalty in California by collaborating with California People of Faith Working Against the Death Penalty. California People of Faith mobilizes religious organizations to advocate for an end to capital punishment.

The Healing Justice Program is also part of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition (PHSS), along with other organization, activists, and family members of prisoners in solitary confinement. The Coalition works to drastically reduce the number of people held in isolation, institute due process, and address conditions of confinement. AFSC advocates implementation of the five demands of hunger strikers, and serves on the Mediation Team and Legislative Teams to advocate for policy changes.

AFSC also promotes healing and wholeness approaches as alternatives to violence and punishment. Program staff develop relevant curricula and have influenced community-based programs in at least two counties.

 

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