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Acting in Faith

Acting in Faith

Vincent Harding on creating the Quaker community that does not yet exist

By: Lucy Duncan
Published: August 7, 2013
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About the Author

Lucy serves as Director of Friends Relations for AFSC. She has been a storyteller for 20 years and has worked with Quaker meetings on telling stories for racial justice and of spiritual experience. Before working for AFSC, she was Director of Communications at FGC, managed QuakerBooks of FGC, and owned and managed her own children's bookstore in Omaha, The Story Monkey. She attends Green Street Friends Meeting (PhYM) and lives with her son and partner in a Quaker cemetery.

Accompaniment: An experiment in healing justice

By: Laura Magnani
Published: July 30, 2013
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Laura Magnani, a member of Strawberry Creek Friends Meeting in Berkeley, Calif., and the director of AFSC’s Bay Area Healing Justice program, tells the story of how local Quaker congregations accompanied a formerly incarcerated man back into the community.

About the Author

Laura Magnani is director of AFSC’s Bay Area Healing Justice Program in California and has worked on criminal justice issues for over 35 years. She received her BA from the University of California in ethnic studies in 1971 and an MA from the Pacific School of Religion in 1982. She has worked on criminal justice issues for AFSC since 1989. She wrote "America's First Penitentiary: A 200 Year Old Failure in 1990" and co-authored the AFSC publication, “Beyond Prisons: A New Interfaith Paradigm for Our Failed Prison System" in 2006. She is a member of Strawberry Creek Meeting of Pacific Yearly Meeting.

"The Arab Street"

By: Max Carter
Published: July 23, 2013
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About the Author

Max Carter just completed a long tenure as director of Friends Center at Guilford College. Max is a recorded Friends minister with interests in the Middle East, the Amish, conscientious objection, and Quaker history. His graduate studies at the Earlham School of Religion and Temple University were in campus ministry and American religious history.

On George Zimmerman: Getting past denial so we can begin to heal

By: Lucy Duncan
Published: July 20, 2013
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About the Author

Lucy serves as Director of Friends Relations for AFSC. She has been a storyteller for 20 years and has worked with Quaker meetings on telling stories for racial justice and of spiritual experience. Before working for AFSC, she was Director of Communications at FGC, managed QuakerBooks of FGC, and owned and managed her own children's bookstore in Omaha, The Story Monkey. She attends Green Street Friends Meeting (PhYM) and lives with her son and partner in a Quaker cemetery.

Dis-Heartened: On recognizing the disease that killed Trayvon

By: Niyonu Spann
Published: July 16, 2013
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About the Author

Niyonu Spann is the director of the music group Tribe 1 and creator of Beyond Diversity 101, a five-day intensive experience grounded in faith that brings people together to acknowledge and manifest oneness. Read an interview with her or read more at her website.

Swannanoa Valley Friends Meeting minute on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

By: Lucy Duncan
Published: July 9, 2013
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About the Author

Lucy serves as Director of Friends Relations for AFSC. She has been a storyteller for 20 years and has worked with Quaker meetings on telling stories for racial justice and of spiritual experience. Before working for AFSC, she was Director of Communications at FGC, managed QuakerBooks of FGC, and owned and managed her own children's bookstore in Omaha, The Story Monkey. She attends Green Street Friends Meeting (PhYM) and lives with her son and partner in a Quaker cemetery.

Living a message of peace: An interview with the Arredondos

By: Madeline Schaefer
Published: July 3, 2013
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In the immediate aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, Carlos Arredondo made headlines for courageously rushing to save the lives of victims—distinctive in his cowboy hat, he quickly became the iconic hero amid tragedy. As the dust settled, people learned that Carlos was there with his wife, Melida, honoring the memory of their sons—Alex, a soldier who died in the Iraq War and Brian, who struggled with mental health issues after his brother’s death and eventually took his own life.

In this interview, Carlos and Melida talk about their antiwar and mental-health activism, and how they are working to heal the wounds of violence both at home and abroad.

About the Author

Madeline is the Friends Relations Associate. She grew up in the beautiful Radnor Meeting community outside of Philadelphia, and attended Friends Schools in the area until the end of High School.  After several years of studying and traveling, she returned to Philadelphia only to immerse herself once again in the stories, the culture and the spirituality of Philadelphia Quakers.  While living in collective house in West Philadelphia, she grew curious about the history of young Quaker activists in the neighborhood, and started an oral history project to find out more.  Madeline is interested in exploring the ways in which life in community can stretch our capacity for compassion and growth.  Her dream is to create more alternative communities of people learning how to live together, creating models for a society fueled by cooperation and love.

From the inside, out: Transforming Baltimore prisons

By: Madeline Schaefer
Published: June 28, 2013
Topics:

About the Author

Madeline is the Friends Relations Associate. She grew up in the beautiful Radnor Meeting community outside of Philadelphia, and attended Friends Schools in the area until the end of High School.  After several years of studying and traveling, she returned to Philadelphia only to immerse herself once again in the stories, the culture and the spirituality of Philadelphia Quakers.  While living in collective house in West Philadelphia, she grew curious about the history of young Quaker activists in the neighborhood, and started an oral history project to find out more.  Madeline is interested in exploring the ways in which life in community can stretch our capacity for compassion and growth.  Her dream is to create more alternative communities of people learning how to live together, creating models for a society fueled by cooperation and love.

Acting in Faith podcast: Calling forth the goodness, Episode 4

Calling Forth the Goodness is a podcast series produced through AFSC's Friends relations blog, Acting in Faith. It features the voices of communities that work together to create change.

In this episode, "From the inside out," Madeline sits down with participants in AFSC's Friend of a Friend mentoring program that works in Baltimore prisons. The program teaches skills in nonviolent communication and conflict resolution, while empowering men to advocate for change both inside and outside of the prison walls.

Produced by Madeline Schaefer. Music by Quakers.

‘Tis a gift to be free: A sermon on simplicity

By: Tai Amri Spann Wilson
Published: June 27, 2013
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About the Author

Tai Amri Spann-Wilson is a preschool teacher and youth minister in Lawrence, Kansas. He has deep roots in Philadelphia and among Quakers, ignites a fire in those around him with his messages about radical change, the edges of poverty, racism, spiritual depth and transformation, and the remarkable grace of humanity. He has a degree from the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics and studied theology at the Pacific School of Religion. He served as a co-pastor of a Disciples of Christ Church in Oakland, California for two years during the height of the Occupy Movement. He is currently, impatiently, awaiting the birth of his first child with his powerful partner Shannon.

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